Jacques Bermon Webster II, also known as Travis Scott, had an astronomical year in 2018. He welcomed his first child, Stormi Webster, Feb. 1. Nine days later, Feb. 10 was declared Travis Scott Day in his hometown of Missouri City, Texas. He performed the halftime show at the Super Bowl, and his long awaited album “ASTROWORLD” was released in early August 2018, with a world tour that followed.

I went to that tour in Phoenix. My mosh pit credential is still hanging from the rearview mirror in my car. It catches my eye every now and then on the road, never failing to take me down a rabbit hole of reminiscence. Despite countless bruises and losing my hat, I had an unforgettable time partying with Travis Scott and some of my closest friends.

Fast forward to the present day, and Travis’ documentary was released on Netflix Aug. 28. The film, titled “Travis Scott: Look Mom I Can Fly,” has a runtime of 1 hour and 25 minutes and was directed by Tyler Ross, also known as White Trash Tyler.

The opening minutes of the documentary show clips from various Travis Scott performances. The themes of a Travis Scott show remained consistent between what I saw in person and what was shown in the documentary: sweat, pyrotechnics and a massive horde of rowdy kids seeking euphoria.

The camera cuts from a venue manager preparing security detail for the mayhem of a Travis Scott concert to fans flipping into the audience and crowd-surfing, just as Travis encourages them to do.

The crowds at his concerts weren’t always as electric and lively as they are today. The documentary shows a clip of Travis early on in his career, performing for a tiny crowd. The director juxtaposes this with a view of him watching his old performance, before he took the stage in a sold out arena.

It is moments like these that make the documentary so inspiring. There are multiple points in the film that show moments of Travis’ upbringing, then immediately switch to scenes that highlight how his daring childhood dream has taken him so far. Like when he visits his old bedroom at his grandmother’s house, then waves her goodbye and drives off in his chocolate-brown Lamborghini.

It is rare that we get an insight into Travis’ creative process. I love what the documentary offers, showing the artist’s studio work with James Blake, audio engineers and Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker, as they contributed to songs on “ASTROWORLD.”

There is no narration, just a hodgepodge of clips dating from Travis’ childhood to last year. It flows better without a narrator, in my opinion. The film’s message is more effective when scenes are viewed raw, rather than with someone explaining them.

The documentary shows his stellar journey last year, from beginning to end. The documentary’s high points are its inspirational moments and behind-the-scenes footage, like Travis losing it when he first hears Drake’s guest verse on “SICKO MODE.”

Ultimately, the documentary is great for fans to experience Travis’ creative process and work ethic, and I’m happy to see a smidgen of that.

Jacques Bermon Webster II, also knows as Travis Scott, had an astronomical year in 2018. He welcomed his first child, Stormi Webster, Feb. 1. Nine days later, Feb. 10 was declared Travis Scott Day in his hometown of Missouri City, Texas. He performed the halftime show at the Super Bowl, and his long awaited album “ASTROWORLD” was released in early August 2018, with a world tour that followed.

I went to that tour in Phoenix. My mosh pit credential is still hanging from the rearview mirror in my car. It catches my eye every now and then on the road, never failing to take me down a rabbit hole of reminiscence. Despite countless bruises and losing my hat, I had an unforgettable time partying with Travis Scott and some of my closest friends.

Fast forward to the present day, and Travis’ documentary was released on Netflix Aug. 28. The film, titled “Travis Scott: Look Mom I Can Fly,” has a runtime of 1 hour and 25 minutes and was directed by Tyler Ross, also known as White Trash Tyler.

The opening minutes of the documentary show clips from various Travis Scott performances. The themes of a Travis Scott show remained consistent between what I saw in person and what was shown in the documentary: sweat, pyrotechnics and a massive horde of rowdy kids seeking euphoria.

The camera cuts from a venue manager preparing security detail for the mayhem of a Travis Scott concert to fans flipping into the audience and crowd-surfing, just as Travis encourages them to do.

The crowds at his concerts weren’t always as electric and lively as they are today. The documentary shows a clip of Travis early on in his career, performing for a tiny crowd. The director juxtaposes this with a view of him watching his old performance, before he took the stage in a sold out arena.

It is moments like these that make the documentary so inspiring. There are multiple points in the film that show moments of Travis’ upbringing, then immediately switch to scenes that highlight how his daring childhood dream has taken him so far. Like when he visits his old bedroom at his grandmother’s house, then waves her goodbye and drives off in his chocolate-brown Lamborghini.

It is rare that we get an insight into Travis’ creative process. I love what the documentary offers, showing the artist’s studio work with James Blake, audio engineers and Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker, as they contributed to songs on “ASTROWORLD.”

There is no narration, just a hodgepodge of clips dating from Travis’ childhood to last year. It flows better without a narrator, in my opinion. The film’s message is more effective when scenes are viewed raw, rather than with someone explaining them.

The documentary shows his stellar journey last year, from beginning to end. The documentary’s high points are its inspirational moments and behind-the-scenes footage, like Travis losing it when he first hears Drake’s guest verse on “SICKO MODE.”

Ultimately, the documentary is great for fans to experience Travis’ creative process and work ethic, and I’m happy to see a smidgen of that.